DCSF consultation convulsions vol. 3: the primary curriculum

Another day, another consultation… The latest is the independent review into the primary curriculum Sir Jim Rose. An interim report was published late last year and the deadline for comments passed over the weekend.

So what did Sir Jim Rose have to say about children with special educational needs and the primary curriculum? Given that one in five children are reported to have some form of special educational need, it’s obviously going to be high on the agenda when considering how the primary curriculum should be reformed and made relevant to everyone. Yes?

Well, here’s the thing. There was virtually no mention. No mention of deaf children, and no mention of any other group who might have additional needs.

OK, so it’s only an interim report. But if you’re going to looking at major reforms of the primary curriculum, surely you’re going to want to consider how everyone is going to access this new curriculum, and make recommendations for how this will be met FROM THE OUTSET. Not afterwards. And definitely not after the whole thing has been implemented on the ground.

The Government has done this before – by introducing phonics as a new method of teaching literacy without considering how this would work for deaf children.

Our response has been to say you can’t get away with treating deaf children as an afterthought. No new curriculum initiatives should be introduced unless without first considering – at the very beginning – how the needs of all children can be met.

Here’s hoping someone in the review team heeds this point.

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One thought on “DCSF consultation convulsions vol. 3: the primary curriculum

  1. It would be great if governments and teachers alike would start thinking about all children and not those that don’t have special needs. Some schools they have only one way of teaching and it doesn’t matter if a child is deaf, autism or learning disability. Yet if they change their criteria for the childrens needs it would be a win win situation.

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